News Roundup

  • Himalayas proving to be a hotspot for describing new species.
  • A roundup of the recent SCB conference in China, from CI.
  • The amazing impact of a city abandoned 900 years ago on crops grown in drought conditions, today. So, the next time somebody tells you there’s no such thing as wilderness, that human’s impact on the land lasts longer than you could imagine, BELIEVE IT.It’s true in America, too, where old American Indian middens still have higher levels of non-native plants.
  • Extinctions can be correlated with genetic history. Not surprising, but interesting.
Posted by Tim on August 10th, 2009 • • Comments Off
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News Roundup

  • Sumatra may get additional forest lands conserved through a pretty large ($30million over 8 years) debt-for-nature swap, negotiated by CI.
  • First bald-faced songbird in Asia described by WCS scientists in Laos.
  • Oysters are returning to Chesapeake Bay. Or, we’re bringing ‘em back. Successfully!
  • In the same issue of Science that reported the oyster comeback, there’s optimistic news on the world’s fisheries. As pointed out in that article, this study was a follow-up to an earlier report that was much more pessimistic. This time, though, the original author teamed up with one of his fiercest critics, which is pretty sweet and sort of hard to imagine.
  • Here’s an interesting, short note on the Mountain Gorillas in Bwindi: now that elephants have left the forest, and conservation has prohibited logging, vegetation preferred by gorillas can’t grow any more, so they’re moving out into farms and raiding crops. +1 trophic cascades.
Posted by Tim on August 6th, 2009 • • Comments Off
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News Roundup

  • Conservation Biologist is one of the ten best green jobs.
  • Watch what happens to Britain’s electric and water grid after East Enders (award-winning evening soap opera) ends. 1 million tea kettles go on within 5 minutes, that’s what happens. Seems a little strange (or perhaps an exaggeration) that such an important operation isn’t carried out by computers
  • William Laurance weighs in on the claim that extinction in tropical rainforests isn’t going to be as bad as predicted.
  • Despite the conflict, Virunga’s gorilla population appears to be doing okay.
  • CI is offering free software for mapping hotspots, or something.
  • Here’s a nice article on Santiago Espinosa, a grad student at UF-Gainesville and WCS Research Fellow, and his camera traps in Yasuni NP.
  • Salazar’s saying he’ll review midnight regulations from the Bush administration’s Interior Department.
Posted by Tim on January 28th, 2009 • • Comments Off
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News Roundup

  • Yusof Basiron, CEO of the Malaysian Palm Oil Council, asks (ON HIS BLOG) that scientists compare the biodiversity of palm oil plantations to other agricultural habitats, not the rainforest they’re actually destroying. Corey’s not happy.
  • Spending time in nature is “like a vacation for the prefontal cortex.” Duuude.
  • Here’s an interesting piece from Fortune about the increasing ties between big NGOs (WWF, CI, Sierra Club) and Fortune 500 companies (Clorox, Coca Cola). On the one hand, it’s great that large companies seem to think that consumers want “greener” corporations. On the other hand, many NGOs are worried that taking donations from big companies may make them “run the risk of letting money cloud our judgment.”
  • Some amazing photographs from a European Wildlife Photography award (beware severed monkey heads).
  • Interesting thoughts on the unintended consequences of the ESA from ESABlawg. I wonder if ESA reform will happen in the next eight years.
Posted by Tim on November 18th, 2008 • • Comments Off
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News Roundup

  • The Kirtland’s Warbler may be permanently endangered, says the AP. In the same article, they admit that their population has increased ten-fold in the past 20 years. Headlines!
  • CI describes the World Conservation Congress, the “Olympics of Conservation,” says Russ Mittermeier.
  • Speaking of Urban Ecology, Nick Paumgarten, in his typically shambolic prose, describes the work of Marko Pecarevic. Pecarevic, a grad student with James Danoff-Burg, studied ant population dynamics in the medians of Manhattan. Previous New Yorker coverage of Manhattan’s wildlife: Beaver, Coyote
Posted by Tim on September 22nd, 2008 • • Comments Off
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